Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control

The basic form of the flashlight seems obvious and intuitive today, but designers of early portable electric lights were heavily influenced by old technology. Many of their devices looked like candlesticks, candleholders, or lanterns. Owen T. Bugg, Jr., almost got it right in 1898 with his “portable electric lamp,” marketed as the O. T. Bugg Friendly Beacon Electric Candle. The cylindrical battery case remained upright, like a candle, but Bugg mounted the lamp on the side, so the device looked something like a beer stein with a headlight.The basic form of the flashlight seems obvious and intuitive today, but designers of early portable electric lights were heavily influenced by old technology. Many of their devices looked like candlesticks, candleholders, or lanterns. Owen T. Bugg, Jr., almost got it right in 1898 with his “portable electric lamp,” marketed as the O. T. Bugg Friendly Beacon Electric Candle. The cylindrical battery case remained upright, like a candle, but Bugg mounted the lamp on the side, so the device looked something like a beer stein with a headlight.

Flashlight Headline

Advised her not to do so, because there were thousands of bad Commas, wild Question Marks and devious Semikoli, but the Little Blind Text didn’t listen. She packed her seven versalia, put her initial into the belt and made herself on the way.  Even the all-powerful Pointing has no control about the blind texts it is an almost unorthographic life One day however a small line of blind text by the name of Lorem Ipsum decided to leave for the far World of Grammar.

far from the countries Vokalia and Consonantia, there live the blind texts. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. Separated they live in Bookmarksgrove right at the coast of the Semantics, a large language ocean. A small river named Duden flows by their place and supplies it with the necessary regelialia. It is a paradisematic country, in which roasted parts of sentences fly into your mouth.

To the casual observer, a discussion of “flashlight technology” seems like gilding the lily. You push a button, a light comes on; you push it again, the light goes off. Not very technical. Forty years ago, that would have been the extent of the discussion. Today, our flashlights use a wide variety of power sources and types of illumination, and generally cost a lot more than the $1.98 one would pay for a two-cell light at the hardware store.

Up until relatively recently, the incandescent bulb was the source of most artificial light, both in the home and in the typical flashlight. A standard incandescent bulb uses a tungsten wire, aka a filament, strung between two electrodes. The filament is contained within a sealed glass chamber (the bulb) from which the air has been extracted to a near-vacuum and partially replaced with nitrogen, a halogen gas, or a mixture of the two. When current is passed through the filament, it heats up and glows brightly. The absence of oxygen inside the bulb keeps it from burning up. Break that vacuum seal while the light is on, and you’ll see a brief white flash as the filament oxidizes and evaporates.